Follow us
Publications Commentary Research People Events News Resources and Videos About IFS
Home Publications Preferences and beliefs in the marriage market for young brides

Preferences and beliefs in the marriage market for young brides

IFS Working Paper W19/05

Rajasthani women typically leave school early and marry young. We develop a novel discrete choice methodology using hypothetical vignettes to elicit average parental preferences over a daughter’s education and age of marriage, and subjective beliefs about the evolution of her marriage market prospects. We find parents have a strong preference for delaying a daughter’s marriage until eighteen but no further. Conditional on a marriage match, parents place little intrinsic value on a daughter’s education. However, they believe the probability of receiving a good marriage offer increases strongly with a daughter’s education but deteriorates quickly with her age on leaving school.

More on this topic

IFS Working Paper WP19/23
Global access to preschool has increased dramatically yet preschool quality is often poor. We use a randomized controlled trial to evaluate two approaches to improving the quality of Colombian preschools.
Newspaper article
In November last year, Nigeria declared that its water supply, sanitation and hygiene sector was in crisis. A community-level intervention aims to reduce open defecation and improve toilet coverage. So why does it work in some places and not others?
IFS Working Paper W19/10
The low take-up of cost-effective and highly subsidised preventive health technologies in low-income countries remains a puzzle. In this paper we analyse whether, and how, micro- finance supports a large public health subsidy program in the developing world - the Swachh Bharat Mission - in ...
IFS Working Paper W19/09
Credit constraints are considered to be an important barrier hindering adoption of preventive health investments among low-income households in developing countries. We find labelling loans is a viable strategy to improve uptake of lumpy preventive health investments.