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Briefing notes

We produce short briefing notes on current policy issues, drawing on our expertise and research findings.
Briefing note
We address questions around vacancies and labour shortages by bringing together fine-grained data on the demand and supply sides of the labour market up to the summer of 2021.
Briefing note
This briefing note provides an update on school spending trends over time, covering the most recent sets of data, forecasts and policy announcements.
Briefing note
In this note, we analyse how participation in and spending on 16–18 education have evolved over recent years.
Briefing note
Over the last two decades, Sure Start Children’s Centres (and their predecessors, Sure Start Local Programmes) have been one of the most important policy programmes in the early years in England. These centres operate as ‘one-stop shops’ for families with children under 5, bringing together a ...
Briefing note
As lockdowns are lifted and more economic activity is resumed, the extent, speed and nature of the UK’s economic recovery from the pandemic will be a crucial determinant of the Chancellor’s options at the upcoming Spending Review, expected this autumn.
Briefing note
Lucinda Platt and ‪Carolina V. Zuccotti
This briefing note sheds greater light on how historical disadvantages are, or are not, replicated in today’s education system and labour market, and the implications for targeted versus more general policies to level the playing field.
Briefing note
This briefing note describes the range and level of COVID-related spending on education in England.
Briefing note
Samantha Burn, Carol Propper, George Stoye, Max Warner, Paul Aylin and Alex Bottle
In this briefing note, we use administrative hospital data from across the NHS in England to describe how the use of inpatient (elective and emergency) and outpatient hospital care in 2020 compared with that in the previous year.
Briefing note
In an ongoing programme of research, we aim to examine in detail how pension saving might be expected to change over working life, and how employees and the self-employed behave in practice.
Briefing note
In this briefing note, we use a life-cycle economic model to illustrate that there are good reasons for saving rates not to be constant over working life, due to predictable factors that change with age.