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Jack Britton

Jack Britton

Associate Director

Education

PhD Economics, University of Bristol, 2014
MSc Economics (Distinction), University of Bristol, 2010
BSc Mathematics, Imperial College London, 2008

Jack joined the IFS in 2013 and works in the Education and Skills sector. His main interests lie in human capital accumulation and discrete choice dynamic modelling. Jack's recent work has included analysis of the effect of replacing the EMA with the 16-19 Bursary in England on participation and attainment, measuring human capital of university graduates in England, and modelling the interaction between health and human capital.

Academic outputs

IFS Working Paper W21/24
Using a large and novel administrative dataset, this paper investigates variation in returns to different higher education ‘degrees’ (subject-institution combinations) in the United Kingdom.
IFS Working Paper W21/13
The ‘curse of dimensionality’ is a common problem in the estimation of dynamic models: as models get more complex, the computational cost of solving these models rises exponentially.

Reports and comment

Observation
We have constructed a new student finance calculator, based on our detailed analysis of graduate earnings and the student finance system, which allows users to look at the effects of changing any parameter of the system.
Report
In this report, we investigate how adjusting for cost of living affects the returns to different higher education options.

Presentations

Presentation
Further and higher education providers face severe resource challenges as a result of the COVID-19 pandemic. At this event, IFS researchers and panellists Philip Augar and Mary Curnock Cook analysed these challenges.
Presentation
IFS researchers presented the key findings from their second annual report on education spending in England, supported by the Nuffield Foundation, providing consistent measures of day-to-day spending per pupil in England across the four main stages of education stretching back to the early 1990s.